Video Resources for Imperialism Class Notes (may need to watch out of school because of filter)
YouTube - Annexation of Hawaii
US State Department - Annexation of Hawaii (text)
How Stuff Works - America Becomes a World Power
HippoCampus - Spanish-American War (click on "Start Topic")
HippoCampus - Panama Canal (click on "Start Topic")

Panama Canal
While Americans had long adhered to the belief that it was to not exert power and control over other nations and peoples, the enormous economic growth of the United States in the late 1800s inspired many people to begin to think of the U.S. as a world power. This economic imperialism encouraged U.S. business leaders to promote access to the Pacific via a Central American canal. Supporters of military sea power also urged the U.S. government to consider the canal as an important strategic move for national security. Under the administration of President Theodore Roosevelt, the dreams of U.S. imperialists were given free reign. Roosevelt was fond of quoting a West African proverb, “Speak softly and carry a big stick, and you will go far” as his motto for pursuing his goals of expanding United States influence in Latin America. This mode of diplomacy became popularly known as “Big Stick” diplomacy.

With the passage of the Hay-Pauncefort Treaty in 1901, the British government gave up its right to joint construction of a canal through the Isthmus of Panama and ceded exclusive rights to the United States. In 1903, under the terms of the Hay-Herrán Treaty, the United States offered Colombia (which then occupied Panama) $10 million and a yearly payment of $250,000 for a 99-year lease for construction of a canal. Colombia was hesitant to cooperate with the United States’s desire for a canal and rejected the Hay-Herrán Treaty. Events in Panama were in Roosevelt’s favor, though. Panamanian leaders who supported the building of the canal began to plot against the Colombian government. On November 3, 1903, the Panamanians began their revolution. While U.S. warships blocked Colombian troops from landing in Panama, the rebels easily took over and declared Panama an independent nation. With unusual speed the U.S. Senate ratified the Hay–Bunau-Varilla Treaty on November 18, 1903, which granted the United States exclusive canal rights. Construction on the canal began in 1904 and was finished 10 years later.
Source: http://docushare.ycs.k12.pa.us/docushare/dsweb/Get/Document-22442/cartoon19.pdf

DIRECTIONS:
1. Choose one of the political cartoons below or search for another cartoon related to US imperialism.
2. Open this Pages document external image x-zip.png ImperialismCartoonAnalysis.pages, paste your cartoon into the document and then analyze it using the questions on the page.



PoliticalCartoon1.jpg
PoliticalCartoon1.jpg

TRColombia.jpg
TRColombia.jpg

TRBigStick.jpg
TRBigStick.jpg


external image Cartoon%202.jpg
external image Cartoon%202.jpg

Detroit News, 1898. Caption: How Some Apprehensive People Picture Uncle Sam after the War.


external image Cartoon%203.jpg
external image Cartoon%203.jpg

Fred Morgan, Philadelphia Inquirer, 1898
Caption: "It’s really most extraordinary what training will do. Why, only the other day I thought that man unable to support himself.”




external image Cartoon%204.jpg
external image Cartoon%204.jpg


Chicago Record-Herald, 1901.
Caption: Miss Cuba Receives an Invitation. “Won’t you join the stars and be my 46th?”


external image Cartoon%206.jpg
external image Cartoon%206.jpg

Chicago Inter Ocean 1905
UNCLE SAM to PORTO RICO: "And to think that bad boy came near to being your brother!"


Image sources: http://msmcdushistory2.pbworks.com/American-Imperialism-Political-Cartoon-Activity